Life Lessons from Rihanna and Gaga: Guns and Whores

Pop stars aren't role models, and music videos shouldn't be how-to-videos on sex and revenge.

I happen to be a huge Lady Gaga fan. From both a psychological and creative perspective, she's talented, unique, and hardly boring. So, count me in. But I have to say, the fact that Janet Jackson had to crawl out from the media storm that followed after she showed a little boob to football fans during a Super Bowl halftime show, makes it all the more confusing to me that the media response following Lady Gaga's simulation of sex and suicide on the American Idol finale stage last week has been so oddly benign. To a viewing audience made up of millions of tween and teen girls looking for someone to idolize, no less. I guess the relationship between football and boobs is more unsettling to people than the relationship between 12 year-olds and sex-suicide-performance art. I definitely missed that memo.



Twelve year-old girls are undoubtedly giving blow jobs in the back of bar-mitzvah party buses, and if you're a parent and you don't believe me, then you're in denial. I'm all for entertainment and expressing yourself, and I'm hardly from the camp that solely blames celebrities for the 16 and Pregnant extravaganza. But here's the thing, celebs have a way of making it seem like sex makes you happy and successful, when really, if you're humping a door like Keri Hilson (see below) or spreading your legs on top of a cardboard mountain like Gaga, this might land you in the category of sophomore class whore. And that wouldsuck.



If the American Idol audience, for example, was made up of emotionally intelligent and mentally stable adults, possibly even a football fan or two, this whole scene would be considered artistic, which was likely the intention, but it's not. The audience is made up of on-the-cusp teens who are in the midst of deciding if having sex -- even if they don't want to -- will in fact make them popular and cool. It's an impressionable time.

Turning a blind eye to pop culture and becoming an over-the-top teen with a cold, prude bitch streak really isn't the solution. But a little self-respect does go a long way. I'm just not sure what celeb is preaching that on the necessary level though, and it would be kinda nice to have someone to balance out the crazy.

Rihanna certainly isn't. Her backwards definition of self-respect and female empowerment resembles a diagnosable level of unstable anger and is interpreted in her new "Man Down" video as a recommendation to gun down your rapist. Yes, feel free to read that sentence again. Soak it in.

I'm trying to imagine the thought process that went into planning that video. Rihanna's voice of reason: "This will likely be another dangerously irresponsible use of celebrity for the purposes of a personal and therapeutic release." Rihanna: "Let's do it!" Good times.

So, the lesson? Put down your firearms and don't behave like a whore. Rihanna and Lady Gaga are talented, but clearly, sometimes even they miss the memo.

Connect With TMR

Recent Writers

View all writers »

March 2017
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31